Neck, Anterior (1:8 Vertical)

Patient position: The patient sits upright and looks straight ahead. Hair is retracted out of view to expose the injury or pathology.

Background: A uniform background is desired. A black, blue, or gray color is ideal; however, white is acceptable.

Film: ASA 100 or 200 Ektachrome.

Exposure setting: Aperture priority mode with an aperture setting of f11 or smaller (f16 or f22).

Reproduction ratio: 1:8.

Camera position: The camera is held in the vertical format on a plane parallel to the anterior neck.

Flash position: The flash is held off-camera along the bottom of the barrel of the lens directed at the anterior neck.

Plane of focus: At the level of the neck or pathology.

Tips: A precise reproduction ratio of 1:8 is obtained by placing the camera on manual focus, moving the focus ring to a reproduction ratio of 1:8, moving the camera closer to or farther from the subject until the neck is in sharp focus, and shooting the photograph. The center of the frame is at the level of the thyroid cartilage. Ensure that the camera is level with the neck.

 Common mistakes: The most common mistake is the chin positioned too high or too low. Another is leaving the flash in the hot shoe, which doe snot evenly illuminate the neck. Remove distractions such as clothing, patient gown, and jewelry from the field of view unless they are part of the pathology or injury. Make sure that no clothing marks such as indentations from a tight collar or tie are photographed.

 

 

Neck, Anterior, Chin Elevated (1:8 Vertical)

Patient position: The patient sits upright and tilts his or her head back as far as comfortably possible. Hair is retracted out of view to expose the injury or pathology.

Background: A uniform background is desired. A black, blue, or gray color is ideal; however, white is acceptable.

Film: ASA 100 or 200 Ektachrome.

Exposure setting: Aperture priority mode with an aperture setting of f11 or smaller (f16 or f22).

Reproduction ratio: 1:8.

Camera position: The camera is held in the vertical format on a plane parallel to the anterior neck.

Flash position: The flash is held off-camera along the bottom of the barrel of the lens directed at the anterior neck.

Plane of focus: At the level of the neck or pathology.

Tips: A precise reproduction ratio of 1:8 is obtained by placing the camera on manual focus, moving the focus ring to a reproduction ratio of 1:8, moving the camera closer to or farther from the subject until the neck is in sharp focus, and shooting the photograph. The center of the frame is at the level of the thyroid cartilage. Ensure that the camera is level with the neck.

Common mistakes: The most common mistake is the chin positioned too high or too low. Another is leaving the flash in the hot shoe, which doe snot evenly illuminate the neck. Remove distractions such as clothing, patient gown, and jewelry from the field of view unless they are part of the pathology or injury. Make sure that no clothing marks such as indentations from a tight collar or tie are photographed.

 

 

Neck, Lateral (1:8 Vertical)

Patient position: The patient sits upright and looks straight ahead. Hair is retracted out of view to expose the injury or pathology.

Background: A uniform background is desired. A black, blue, or gray color is ideal; however, white is acceptable.

Film: ASA 100 or 200 Ektachrome.

Exposure setting: Aperture priority mode with an aperture setting of f11 or smaller (f16 or f22).

Reproduction ratio: 1:8.

Camera position: The camera is held in the vertical format on a plane parallel to the lateral neck.

Flash position: The flash is held off-camera along the bottom of the barrel of the lens directed at the lateral neck.

Plane of focus: At the level of the neck or pathology.

Tips: A precise reproduction ratio of 1:8 is obtained by placing the camera on manual focus, moving the focus ring to a reproduction ratio of 1:8, moving the camera closer to or farther from the subject until the neck is in sharp focus, and shooting the photograph. The center of the frame is at the level of the thyroid cartilage. Ensure that the camera is level with the neck.

Common mistakes: The most common mistake is the chin positioned too high or too low. Another is leaving the flash in the hot shoe, which doe snot evenly illuminate the neck. Remove distractions such as clothing, patient gown, and jewelry from the field of view unless they are part of the pathology or injury. Make sure that no clothing marks such as indentations from a tight collar or tie are photographed.

 

 

Neck, Posterior (1:8 Vertical)

Patient position: The patient sits upright and looks straight ahead. Hair is retracted out of view to expose the injury or pathology.

Background: A uniform background is desired. A black, blue, or gray color is ideal; however, white is acceptable.

Film: ASA 100 or 200 Ektachrome.

Exposure setting: Aperture priority mode with an aperture setting of f11 or smaller (f16 or f22).

Reproduction ratio: 1:8.

Camera position: The camera is held in the vertical format on a plane parallel to the posterior  neck.

Flash position: The flash is held off-camera along the bottom of the barrel of the lens directed at the posterior neck.

Plane of focus: At the level of the neck or pathology.

Tips: A precise reproduction ratio of 1:8 is obtained by placing the camera on manual focus, moving the focus ring to a reproduction ratio of 1:8, moving the camera closer to or farther from the subject until the neck is in sharp focus, and shooting the photograph. The center of the frame is at the level of the thyroid cartilage. Ensure that the camera is level with the neck.

Common mistakes: The most common mistake is the chin positioned too high or too low. Another is leaving the flash in the hot shoe, which doe snot evenly illuminate the neck. Remove distractions such as clothing, patient gown, and jewelry from the field of view unless they are part of the pathology or injury. Make sure that no clothing marks such as indentations from a tight collar or tie are photographed.